Parking firms that force us to pay by app only should be banned from giving fines

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IT is a common sight in car parks across the country, with troubled motorists looking back and forth between their phones and information boards, trying to figure out what they should be doing.

I sympathize with their ferocity, because I’ve been in that position – amazed I needed to download, register, and pay another app I did not have.

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I was also amazed that I needed to download, register and pay for another app that I didn’t have
If you don't have a smartphone that can scan QR codes or download apps, you're left out of many essential services.

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If you don’t have a smartphone that can scan QR codes or download apps, you’re left out of many essential services.

Thankfully my daughter came to the rescue and helped me download the app which was the only payment option. And I am someone who almost always has my mobile in hand.

during the pandemic, zoom call were a life saver, giving a chance to see a familiar face, while whatsapp group Helped me stay in touch.

But when technology frustrates or baffles me, as it often does, I feel like I’m suddenly doomed on a desert island and have no way of reaching out for help.

discriminatory and harmful

This is a situation which is getting worse and someone needs to apply the brakes.

We’re not just entering a cashless societyWe are moving towards a place where even debit or credit cards are becoming obsolete.

If you don’t have a smartphone that can scan QR codes or download apps, you’re left out of many essential services.

People can’t park in hospitals if they don’t have the latest technology, and even if they have the right gadget they are so confused they can get it wrong and end up with a fine. .

I believe that companies that do not provide a means of payment that are accessible to all should not be allowed fine users.

There should be no legal obligation to pay to the parking firm if they have gone app only.

More than 13 percent of British adults don’t use a smartphone and the 1.2 million population doesn’t have a bank account – so what should they do?

We receive countless calls to the Silver Line helpline for older people asking for help accessing important information or making life-saving appointments.

If you want to reach your GP, contact the council or settle your utility bills then the need for internet is increasing rapidly.

We are not only entering a cashless society, we are moving towards a society where even debit or credit cards are becoming obsolete.

Yet 1.5 million British households still do not have internet access.

I live in Hampshire, in the middle of the New Forest, and it took a lot of effort to connect to broadband.

A lot of people in my village still don’t have access to this important piece of infrastructure – and mobile phone signals hate trees, which they cut down.

The pace of change is so fast that very few of us can keep up with it. We have to learn to use a new digital “platform” every time we want to buy something or use a public service.

And the people most alienated from this rush to a fully digital economy are the older generation.

Only 40 percent of people over the age of 65 have a smartphone.

This means that the vast majority of UK OAPs are increasingly excluded from society. This is both discriminatory and harmful to our economy.

If an elderly person can’t go shopping because they can’t park or buy drinks once they’ve visited the stores, this will lead to a reduction in revenue.

I have a friend in the 90s who can type well but is completely intimidated by the idea of ​​a computer, smartphone, or tablet.

When I try to encourage her by explaining that the Internet can take her to places she may never have reached before, she simply can’t cope with the concept.

Decisions are being made by people aged 40 or so who have no understanding of day-to-day life for the elderly.

What we urgently need is a minister for older people with real clout in the cabinet. There is no one to articulate the plight of those of us trapped in this strange chaos that is present in this digital transformation.

Every government department should be asked to think about the elderly before starting new schemes.

The pace of change is so fast that very few of us can keep up with it. We have to learn to use a new digital “platform” every time we want to buy something or use a public service.

This year British Telecom realized it had to slow down its switch from analog to digital phones because there was not enough support for older people.

Age isn’t the only reason why people can’t use these devices.

Modern technology has an inherent obsolescence which means the smartphone is incompatible with apps five years later.

Buying a new one is too expensive for many people, especially during a cost of living crisis, and throwing them away is bad for the planet.

make life difficult

We are entering a world that is cashless and faceless.

When I opened a bank account at age 16, the bank manager talked to me about how to write a check and what dangers I should be aware of.

That personal relationship is being destroyed by closing the banks and replacing them with machinery.

You walk into a supermarket and are offered a machine to scan your purchases so you don’t need to talk to anyone.

Sometimes a conversation with the checkout employee is the only chat an older lonely person will have all day.

We are in a transition between the tried and tested means of communication and the digital revolution.

The Internet clearly has many benefits and I understand why the younger generation craves the convenience of a smartphone.

But they are becoming an inconvenience, making our life difficult instead of easy.

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Unless we have a society that includes phone lines, cash, debit cards and even good old counter workers, many of us will feel excluded.

  • Silver Line offers support and advice on 0800 4 70 80 90.
We are entering a world that is cashless and faceless

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We are entering a world that is cashless and faceless
Smartphones are becoming an inconvenience, making our lives difficult instead of easy

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Smartphones are becoming an inconvenience, making our lives difficult instead of easy



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